SpanishEnglish

French

Italian

German

Japanese

Chinese

Portugués

  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
  • Visit Segovia
Home»Microsites»Religious Segovia

Convents, Monastaries and Sanctuaries

MONASTERIO DE SAN VICENTE EL REAL [SAN VICENTE EL REAL MONASTARY]
The pre-Romanesque church has a single nave with a chancel. The walls are not articulated and are decorated with Baroque alterpieces. An inscription in the cornice attributes the temple to Cister in 1156.
The cloister, built by Pedro de Brizuela, can be found alongside the church. It has four galleries, each with five arches, except the southern gallery, which has six. A continuous platband separates the lower cloister from the upper, also with five arches. These are decorated in red, ochre and grey tones with curved geometric shapes and rosettes. The main parts of the monastery are centred around the cloister.

 

CONVENTO DE LAS CARMELITAS DESCALZAS DE SAN JOSÉ [CONVENT OF THE DISCALCED CARMELITES OF St. JOSEPH]

 

The convent was founded by Santa Teresa de Jesús [Saint Teresa of Jesus] on 19th March, 1547. It was originally located in the building several metres higher than the current location, but was moved in 1579 as more space was needed.

The church has a single, three-aisled nave and a ground-level choir. It originally had a wooden ceiling which was later replaced with plasterwork vaults in the 17th and 18th Centuries.

 

CONVENTO DE SANTO DOMINGO EL REAL [SANTO DOMINGO EL REAL CONVENT]
Located in what was formerly the Palacio de Don Alimán [Don Alimán Palace], a fortress dating from the mid 13th Century, which was later acquired by the Dominican nuns in 1513.
Roman materials were used in its construction.
In the northern side of the cloister is the 13th century Romanesque palace. The interior has been greatly changed, but which conserves its masonry façade with open windows which today houses the convent's vegetable garden. Attached t0 the palace is the Torre de Hércules [Tower of Hercules], also from the 13th century, which owes its name to the figure on a Celtiberian boar built into the walls. It is a rectangular, masonry structure with ashlars in the corners.

Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner