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Home»Microsites»Religious Segovia

Festivals and Traditions

CABALGATA DE REYES [THREE KINGS' PARADE]
Every year on 5th January, eve of the traditional festival of the Reyes Magos [Three Wise Men], Segovia dresses up to receive Melchor, Gaspar and Baltasar, who come laden with gif

 

FIESTA DE SANTA ÁGUEDA [SANTA ÁGUEDA FESTIVAL]
Although all of the neighbourhoods in the city celebrate this festival, without a doubt, the most well-known is that held in Zamarramala. The Santa Águeda Festival in Zamarramala has been declared a Regional Event of Tourist Interest, dating back to the 12th Century, since when it has been custom on this day for women to govern the village. Two "mayoresses" preside over the festival in which the proclamation, the traditional dances, flags blowing in the breeze, the procession, the tajá [a typical small piece of chorizo cooked with wine] or the burning of the effigy are among the highlights.

 

CARNAVAL [CARNIVAL]
The great procession is held, as is tradition, on Shrove Tuesday but many other activities can be enjoyed until the Entierro de la Sardina [Sardine Burial], which marks an end to the festivities on Ash Wednesday.

 

SEMANA SANTA [EASTER WEEK]
Declared a Regional Event of Tourist Interest, a number of parishes and religious associations particpate in acts all over the city.

 

SEMANA DE MÚSICA SACRA [HOLY MUSIC WEEK]
This is held to coincide with Easter week, in which soloists, chamber groups, choirs and orchestras of national and international renown perform.

 

SAN MARCOS [ST. MARK]
The neighbourhood of San Marcos is located outside the City Wall on the banks of the Eresma River. It is a very small neighbourhood and much loved by the Segovian people. On 25th April, feast day of St. Mark, the neighbours association hold a festival with a range of events. Many visitors attend to take part in the long-standing tradition of purchasing hazelnuts, a basic element of this traditional pilgrimage, the first on the city's festival calendar.

 

CORPUS CHRISTI

phoca thumb s corpuschristiinterior 

This festival is connected to the deepest Catholic religious sentiment. The Corpus procession begins at the cathedral continuing through the most central streets, carrying the magnificent custodia accompanied by the children of city's parishes. The streets are left strewn with lavender and rosemary once the procession has passed.

 

 

 

 

 

FIESTAS POPULARES DE SAN JUAN Y SAN PEDRO [POPULAR FEAST OF ST JOHN AND ST. PETER]

 

From the 23rd until the 30th June, Segovia takes to the streets to celebrate the feast days of its patrons in which each neighbourhood chooses a first lady and maids of honour for the festival. Giants and "big-heads" delight the young as well as fireworks, outdoor concerts, bullfights, sports competitions, street theatre, live bands with dancing... all to spend a few days of merriment and togetherness.

 

SAN LORENZO
This is the most popular festival of all the city's neighbourhoods. The live music and dancing in the neighbourhood's fabulous square are worth highlighting as well as the running of the bulls. Every 10th August, San Lorenzo is paraded through the streets in a popular procession.

 

VOTO A SAN ROQUE [VOW TO SAN ROQUE]
The 16th August is the feast day of San Roque. Several years ago, the tradition of making a vow to the saint was renewed which dates back to 1599, when the city was devastated by a plague. During a church council meeting in the Cathedral, San Roque was called upon to intervene and eliminate the disease which did indeed begin to subside. In gratitude, the custom of giving thanks to Roque was born, with a member of the Corporación Municipal [Town Council] reading a prayer each year. The reading is carried out before an image of San Roque which is housed in the Romanesque Church of San Millán.

 

LA CATORCENA
On the first Sunday in September, the festival of the Catorcena has been held since Medieval times. Stemming from the so-called Sucesos del Corpus [Corpus incidents] (15th Century) the tradition to hold a festival in exaltation of the Eucharist was instigated by the 14 parishes then existing in the city -hence the name catorcena, from the Spanish number fourteen-. Each year, one of these is responsible for organising all of the programmed events within their parish, concluding with a Eucharistic procession on the first Sunday in September, which starts in the organising parish and ends at the Corpus Christi Church [Convent of the Order o St. Clare].

 

SAN FRUTOS
This festival takes place on 25th October. On the eve of the festival, the traditional miracle of the turning of the page is re-enacted at the San Frutos Door of the Cathedral. Hundreds of locals gather in front of the image of the saint to witness the turning of the page of the book of life one more year. This is followed by traditional garlic soup offered by the Chef's Association.
On the following morning, the popular San Frutos hymn is performed (written in 19th Century for choir and orchestra).

 

FESTIVAL OF SAINT JOHN OF THE CROSS
This is held on 14th December to coincide with the death of the saint from Ávila. The Segovia Tourist Bureau supplies a programme of activities, held in and around the Monastery of the Discalced Carmelites in honour of their founder.

 

CHRISTMAS IN SEGOVIA
Christmas in Segovia is austere but replete with little touches which make it special. Relief from the cold which blows in from the snow-capped mountains is provided by the bustle of the streets; the decorations on storefronts; bars and restaurants; carol singing in the street and, of course, a visit to the traditional nativity scenes set up in different institutions, parishes and associations in the city.

 

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