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Home»Microsites»The jewish Quarter of Segovia

The Synagogues

First Main Synagogue

Situated in Corpus Christi Square, which takes its name from the present-day appellation of the former synagogue. It was confiscated from the Jewish community at the beginning of the 15th Century. Today it is the church of the Convento de Clarisas del Corpus Christi [Convent of the Corpus Christi Order of St. Clare]. Access to the interior is gained via a courtyard, as would have been the norm, and the building is divided into three naves separated by horseshoe arches upon octagonal columns. A fire in 1899 caused considerable damage to the building and, at the beginning of the 20th Century, the first restoration was carried out. However, more significant was the work carried out in 2004, which saw the restoration of plasterwork, capitals, ceilings...

Old Synagogue

Situated in Plaza de la Merced [La Merced Square], it was donated in 1412 by King Juan I to the friars of La Merced Convent.

Burgos Synagogue

Possibly belonged to a community of Jews from Burgos who fled to Segovia from the assaults they suffered following the riots of 1391. It was located on Calle de Escuderos [Escuderos Street].

Del Campo Synagogue

In Calle de Martínez Campos [Martínez Campos Street], in the part known as Corralillo de los Huesos (a former butcher's shop in which later there were found some bones).

Ibáñez of Segovia Synagogue (Second Main Synagogue)

This substituted the Main Synagogue. It was acquired by the Cathedral Chapter for the Jewish community in 1492, a few days before the expulsion, and underwent numerous modifications in the 17th Century. Occupied until a few years ago by the Jesuitinas School, the remains of a mikvé (ritual baths) were discovered in the late Eighties, and two windows which helped confirm the building's origin as a synagogue.

 

 

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